Summer, Roses and Flycatchers

Roses

Roses have been spectacular. The rambler, ‘Kiftsgate’, is still in flower reaching high into the trees at the bottom of the garden. ‘Bobby James’ which clothes the trellis along the drive has come to an end and we will soon have to take on the challenge of pruning to control and tie in the new growth which will produce next year’s flowers. Really it is too big and rampant for the trellis but the tree it did cover died (probably killed by the rose rather than silver leaf Mr B. maintains) and the trellis was a replacement support. We have also enjoyed the pale salmon flowers of the climber ‘Schoolgirl’ on the walls of the cottage, despite the fact that the leaves are disfigured by  mildew as the bed under the thatch is so dry. The china rose, ‘Mutabilis’ will go on giving pleasure until Christmas if we are lucky. The blooms start out dark red and gradually fade to shades of yellow and copper- sadly it has no scent but it is a beautiful shrub.

Rosa Mundi flourishes in the shady bed behind the pond but the old, wonderfully perfumed, shrub roses at the bottom of the garden are coming to an end. The rich deep red blossoms of ‘Charles de Mills’ are still my favourite.

 

Birds

The garden is full of baby birds- blue tits and great tits must have had second broods and the apple trees are alive with acrobatic infants. A constant cheeping is coming from what must be a blackbird nest in the hedge. However the real thrill is the spotted flycatcher nest in a open-faced box we put up on the wall of the house years ago. I think it is the first time it has been used. The flycatchers are an absolute joy to watch swooping down to catch insects and returning to their elevated lookout perches. We have not had any in the garden for years so this is a real treat.

food arriving (Large)

Shape and perfume

The lilies in their pots on the patio are coming to an end but the white tobacco plants I grew from seed provide evening perfume as well as food for moths. The seed heads of the various alliums provide great structure but I am determined to remove many of them before they actually seed into the flowerbeds- you can have too much of a good thing. The garden is full of summer colour- I really must spend more time just sitting and enjoying it. 

 

 

 

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