Spring and Open Garden Season

Narcissi and scillas

The snow has melted and the snowdrops and narcissi are upright again. In fact many of the snowdrops are well past their best but their lush foliage still makes a statement. The narcissi on the other hand have come into their own so the garden is Easter-ready, abounding with cheerful nodding daffodils. I have more than 40 varieties, generally purchased from Avon or Broadleigh bulbs over the years. I still prefer the small ones especially the cyclamineus cultivars (Div 6)  such as ‘Mite’ , a small cyclamineus that I planted in the damp bed. Narcissus nanus ‘Midget’ (Div 1) in the rock bed really is a midget, a trumpet daffodil only 10cm high.

I am thrilled that Narcissus fernandesii var. cordubensis (Div 13) has flowered. This delicate little daffodil (25cm high) has narrow thread-like leaves and scented flowers about 3cm in diameter. I planted it under the multi-stemmed Himalayan Birch (Betula utilis var. jacquemontii) which is just mature enough to start to show some striking patches of white bark. A few of the brilliant blue flowers of Scilla siberica have also emerged. Perhaps one day I will have swathes of both beneath the silvery bark of the mature tree, but I am afraid that I may have to wait some time.

Daphnes and sweet perfume

The clusters of pink flowers on Daphne odora ‘Aureomarginata’ in the gravel bed  perfume the air by the front door, particularly in the evenings. Daphnes may be short-lived but this one is easy to grow from cuttings so I shall take some later in the year. The fragrant purplish flowers on Daphne mezereum  appear before the leaves and also offer a welcome splash of winter colour along with their scent.  I have just planted a  D. mezereum f. alba (no more than a twig at the moment but flowering nevertheless), which has fragrant white flowers. Eventually it and an even more tiny specimen of Daphne retusa I have just planted, will fill the space which once held the Garrya elliptica. As Marina Schinz said “Gardening is an exercise in optimism.  Sometimes, it is a triumph of hope over experience.”

NGS Opening

The garden is open for the NGS charities and the British Skin Foundation on April 8th so we are keeping our fingers crossed for good weather and a good turnout of visitors. Despite the cold, I think there will be plenty to see………but there is still a lot to do.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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A cold January 2018

 

 

The garden is wintery and the pond has frozen again. The weather has not been conducive to gardening to-day as the rain lashed down most of the day.

However I have had days in the garden as things are definitely moving out there. My snowdrops are really coming into their own, hellebores are in flower, winter aconites (Eranthis hyemalis) are just appearing, my Mum’s Iris unguicularis (stylosa) is still producing numerous flowers and I am thrilled that the Hamamelis intermedia ‘Arnold Promise’  that I planted last year in the damp bed is flowering.

Poor Garrya elliptica was given the heave-ho. I had given it due warning – if it did not perform with a good display of green tassels this year, it would be out as most of the time the dark evergreen leaves do not brighten my day and the tassels gradually start to go brown and just look sorry for themselves. So on Wednesday we removed it leaving me with space in a small North-facing bed that is now replete with fresh compost, top soil and manure. I am going to put in Daphne blagayana at the front. I will enjoy the fragrant, creamy-white terminal clusters of flowers each spring. There will still be space for another small choice shrub and I may also add the odd bulb or even an alpine.

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Garrya elliptica has gone leaving space for something new

 

In fact I have ordered a number of alpines from a small Scottish nursery (Craigiehall Nursery) that I found on-line when I was sitting in bed feeling sorry for myself with a streaming cold over the New Year. Nothing like plants to cheer one up. I am looking forward to their arrival.

I tackled the Michaelmas daisies after looking at the photographs I took last autumn. I have moved them around to provide a better mix of colours and I also split some of the older clumps to rejuvenate the plants. Inevitably there was the odd crunch as the fork hit some of the very large clumps of Nerine bowdenii bulbs, most of which do not flower now because the soil is really too heavy and over the years the bulbs have got covered far too deeply when the bed has been mulched. Nerine lilies do best in a well-drained site with full sun and would love to be at the base of a sunny, south-facing wall if I had one. I have replanted many of them more superficially and moved some to the bed at the base of the cottage wall (south-east facing) – we will see what happens.

Winter Bulbs and Scent

 

Bulbs- snowdrops, irises and even a daffodil

Some snowdrops are in flower, including the fine tall Mrs MacNamara, and many more are nosing their way above ground, but will those I divided last year flower well or sulk? I was delighted to see the little pointed buds of the dwarf iris, Iris reticulata ‘Sheila Ann Germany’ , just showing and the clump seems to have fattened up. By January, I hope a number of these little irises will be in flower providing bright splashes of colour in the gravel garden, rock bed, drive bed and pots.

 

To my delight I found one trumpet daffodil flowering – Narcissus ‘Rijnveld’s Early Sensation’, an award-winning hybrid dating from the 1940s. It is certainly early. I planted a few bulbs in 2016 because it provides winter colour and even stands up to snowfalls. The others in my small clump are probably only a week or so behind and I have more than last year, so eventually  I hope to have a good sized clump .

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Narcissus ‘Rijnveld’s Early Sensation’

Winter Scent

Winter honeysuckle, Lonicera fragrantissima,  was one of the first plants my mother gave me and the shrub has been flowering since the beginning of December. I am going to cut some twigs for the house so we can enjoy the fragrance of the dainty white 2-lipped blossoms indoors as well as out. I know it would flower better if I grew it in a sunnier spot, but then I would not have the benefit of scent by the back door.

Wintersweet, Chimonanthus praecox, is also in flower. The small scented waxy yellow blooms have almost no stem and look as if they have been stuck directly onto the bare twigs. I pruned it hard last spring and now it has flowers that I can reach. It was probably a mistake to plant it so close to the honeysuckle- I should have spread scent around the garden. The pink flower-buds of Daphne odora ‘Aureomarginata’  are also almost open. The perfume will fill the gravel bed and reach the front door where I have another tiny Daphne, Daphne cneorum var. pygmaea, in the small alpine trough. It has highly scented flowers in May. Both my troughs now have smart new covers provided by Mr B – what wonderful Christmas presents.

Leaf mould

The leaf mould bin which looked so full is now half full (or half empty depending on your attitude). The snow compressed the leaves so I am going to have to do some more collecting.  Something to do when the weather improves.