The pond and autumn colour

Pond clearance

The annual clearance of the pond has been completed without mishap. Once more the step-ladder was put to good use as a pond bridge. I have suggested to Mr B. that a Monet Chinese bridge would not only look attractive, but make life much easier for the poor gardener (pond-clearer). However I have to agree that the pond, more of a puddle by Monet’s standards, hardly justifies a bridge, although the grandchildren would have fun.  Anyway, yet again I  suspended myself precariously over the pond by lying on my stomach on said step-ladder, bony prominences on hips and knees cushioned by various kneeling mats, and clothing protected by waterproof trousers and gauntlets.  A female Emperor dragonfly coursed back and forwards over my head looking for somewhere to lay, but unfortunately I had removed most of the long stems of the flowering rush, Butomus umbellatus, which in our case is most definitely non-flowering. The rush is too congested in the small pond, but removing the roots is problematic as the stems tend to snap off. I suspect it will do no better in 2018. What a job, but at least it is done and the pond does look bigger and better.

 

Disappearing ramshorn snails

I am puzzled by the dearth of ramshorn snails which used to be two-a-penny in the pond. Over the last two years the population seems to have dropped. They are vital scavengers, munching up blanket weed and other algae. I may have to introduce more as now the pond is clearer, blanket weed is sure to return.

 

Invasive marsh plants

Thugs have engulfed the small marshy area adjacent to the pond and I have lost, or almost lost, a number of choice plants. I planted Darmera peltata, Houttuynia cordata ‘Chameleon’ and Houttuynia cordata ‘Flore Plena’ when I made the pond with marsh, some 25 years ago – definitely a mistake. I should not have taken my eyes off them. Houttuynias have spread inexorably through the heavy clay, their fleshy underground rhizomes choking delicate plants. Darmera, which is marketed as an alternative to Gunnera manicata, “more suitable for the smaller garden”,  produces dense layers of thick hard rhizomes. Plants do not flourish in the shade under the umbrella-like leaves and the solid clumps of rhizomes are impenetrable. We have made progress on extracting the unyielding Damara rhizomes, but I am afraid I have resorted to weedkiller (and crossed fingers) for the houttuynia.

Autumn flowers

Asters (symphyotrichum), sedums (hylotelephium), and japanese anemones are providing plenty of colour.

 

Cyclamen hederifolium are opening under shrubs and the leaves of the little Acer palmatum var. dissectum ‘Seiryu’ on the patio have just developed a reddish tinge. Mornings are cool, apples are ripe and autumn has arrived.

 

Advertisements